I get it, when it comes to female hormones, it is really easy to get confused. For me personally, it wasn’t until the third year of medical school (after being exposed to the sex hormone cycles a million times) that things started to click.

I don’t want you to have to go through the same thing. Hormones are essential to your body and your health, and it is important that you understand what they are. So here is a quick, no-nonsense look at progesterone! Dr. Esha Singh, ND

What is progesterone? Progesterone is a steroid hormone produced by women from the onset of puberty. It is highest in the second half of the menstrual cycle.  

Where is the progesterone made? Progesterone is secreted by the corpus luteum (a temporary endocrine gland) in the second half of the menstrual cycle. It causes changes in the uterus to make it more hospitable for a fertilized egg; if fertilization doesn’t occur, the corpus luteum becomes inactive (no more hormone secretion), and the period occurs.

Progesterone is secreted by the corpus luteum (a temporary endocrine gland) in the second half of the menstrual cycle. It causes changes in the uterus to make it more hospitable for a fertilized egg; if fertilization doesn’t occur, the corpus luteum becomes inactive (no more hormone secretion), and the period occurs.

What does progesterone do?

  • Helps maintain pregnancy
  • Prepares the body for conception
  • Regulates the monthly menstrual cycle
  • Encourages the growth of milk-producing glands in the breast during pregnancy

What happens if you have too much progesterone? Symptoms of  high progesterone include typical PMS symptoms: mood swings, water retention, and breast tenderness.

What happens if you have too little progesterone?
Symptoms of  low progesterone include:

  • hot flashes
  • low libido
  • weight gain
  • endometriosis/fibroid formation
  • thyroid issues
  • anxiety or depression
  • headaches
  • irregular menstrual cycle

This article is for educational purposes only and is not meant to diagnose, prescribe or treat. Always consult your primary care physician to advise on your wellness goals.

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